Short-hacking?

Short-hacking?

In recent weeks, Matt Levine has written about two potential ways of driving a stock price down. The first via literally hacking into computers:

Joshua Mitts and Eric Talley of Columbia — discussing a different approach, which is that you could just trade on the fact that you could hack into the computers. Then you can disclose the hack and hope that the company’s stock will go down. Cybersecurity breaches tend to be bad news. This approach is … look, I have my doubts about how lucrative it is; cybersecurity breaches tend not to be such bad news … but it has the advantage of not being blatantly illegal. Of being legal? I mean, that is not legal advice, but her

In the second case, it’s not so much true hacking, rather it’s akin to growth hacking.

Shares of the Snapchat parent company sank 6.1 percent on Thursday, wiping out $1.3 billion in market value, on the heels of a tweet on Wednesday from Kylie Jenner, who said she doesn’t open the app anymore

So I am inclined to allow it, though I am of course neither your nor Kylie Jenner’s lawyer. But as a way to profit from celebrity, shorting a company’s stock and then being mean about its products on social media seems pretty easy, and the markets would be more amusing if someone tried it. Social media companies profit because their users provide content for free; I like the idea of the users profiting by deciding to stop.

 

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